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9 - Poland

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 January 2010

Lech Garlicki
Affiliation:
Judge of the European Court of Human Rights, Former Judge of the Constitutional Court of Poland
Małgorzata Masternak-Kubiak
Affiliation:
Professor of the University of Wrocław, Judge of the Regional Administrative Court
Krzysztof Wójtowicz
Affiliation:
Professor of the University of Wrocław, Former Vice President of the University
David Sloss
Affiliation:
Santa Clara University, School of Law
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Summary

STATUS OF TREATIES IN THE DOMESTIC LEGAL SYSTEM

Introduction

Early History, 1921–1952. Until 1997, constitutional regulation of the position of international law in the Polish domestic legal order was rather scarce. The Constitution of March 17, 1921 (adopted after Poland had regained its independence in 1918) provided that international treaties are concluded (i.e., ratified) by the president of the republic. However, ratification of certain categories of treaties required a prior authorization of the parliament; in practice, this authorization was given in the form of a statute. A similar framework was adopted in the Constitution of April 23, 1935 – Article 52, Section 1, clearly established that parliamentary authorization had to be given in the form of a statute.

This system was understood – in both the legal commentary and judicial case law – as based on the concept of transformation: the presidential ratification and the official publication of a treaty in the Journal of Laws transformed its provisions into provisions of domestic law. As indicated by the Supreme Court, “a treaty, when ratified and duly published…becomes a statutory instrument and gains a binding force in the domestic legal relations.” Thus, the date of publication determined the date from which a treaty entered into the domestic legal system. Because ratification required a prior parliamentary authorization and because that authorization took the form of a statute, such treaties were considered to have a statutory rank within the domestic legal order.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Role of Domestic Courts in Treaty Enforcement
A Comparative Study
, pp. 370 - 409
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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  • Poland
    • By Lech Garlicki, Judge of the European Court of Human Rights, Former Judge of the Constitutional Court of Poland, Małgorzata Masternak-Kubiak, Professor of the University of Wrocław, Judge of the Regional Administrative Court, Krzysztof Wójtowicz, Professor of the University of Wrocław, Former Vice President of the University
  • Edited by David Sloss
  • Book: The Role of Domestic Courts in Treaty Enforcement
  • Online publication: 06 January 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511635458.010
Available formats
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Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Poland
    • By Lech Garlicki, Judge of the European Court of Human Rights, Former Judge of the Constitutional Court of Poland, Małgorzata Masternak-Kubiak, Professor of the University of Wrocław, Judge of the Regional Administrative Court, Krzysztof Wójtowicz, Professor of the University of Wrocław, Former Vice President of the University
  • Edited by David Sloss
  • Book: The Role of Domestic Courts in Treaty Enforcement
  • Online publication: 06 January 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511635458.010
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Poland
    • By Lech Garlicki, Judge of the European Court of Human Rights, Former Judge of the Constitutional Court of Poland, Małgorzata Masternak-Kubiak, Professor of the University of Wrocław, Judge of the Regional Administrative Court, Krzysztof Wójtowicz, Professor of the University of Wrocław, Former Vice President of the University
  • Edited by David Sloss
  • Book: The Role of Domestic Courts in Treaty Enforcement
  • Online publication: 06 January 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511635458.010
Available formats
×