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Chapter 5 - Nonrotational forceps and manual rotation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2014

George Attilakos
Affiliation:
University College Hospital, London
Tim Draycott
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
Alison Gale
Affiliation:
Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust
Dimitrios Siassakos
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
Cathy Winter
Affiliation:
Practical Obstetric Multi-Professional Training (PROMPT) Maternity Foundation
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Summary

Developing skills in non-rotational forceps and manual rotation remains an important element of training in operative obstetrics. The aim of operative vaginal birth (OVB) is to expedite birth for the benefit of the mother, baby or both while minimising maternal and neonatal morbidity. This chapter describes the use of non-rotational forceps in detail and also reviews the technique of manual rotation. Non-rotational forceps are mainly used to facilitate vaginal birth when the fetal head is in an occipito-anterior (OA) position. Forceps are classified according to their design as well as the type of operative birth they are used to perform based on station and position of the fetal head. An alternative to vacuum rotation is manual rotation from occiput transverse (OT) or occiput posterior (OP) positions. Simulation in obstetrics allows training and practice in a safe environment and can improve the performance of individuals and obstetric teams.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

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