Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-k7f5t Total loading time: 0.499 Render date: 2022-01-27T12:39:54.116Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

2 - Instream Rights and Unreasonable Use

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 February 2021

Paul Stanton Kibel
Affiliation:
Golden Gate University School of Law
Get access

Summary

California is one among many regions around the world dealing with water scarcity pressures, and these scarcity pressures are compounded by the economic importance of California’s wine sector. As discussed in this chapter, growing grapes can be economically precarious for many reasons, including the vulnerability of grapes to early season frost episodes. One of the main strategies for wine growers to protect grapes from frost is to continuously mist vineyards with water prior to and during the periods in the growing season when temperatures can temporarily drop below freezing. This frost protection technique is used for vineyards not only in California but also in other wine-growing regions such as New Zealand.

For instance, a 2018 article in Wine Enthusiast magazine documented how grape growers in the New Zealand’s Central Otago region used sprinklers to combat frost. According to Andrew Donaldson, owner of the Akitu Winery in the New Zealand’s Central Otago region, “In spring, our primary defense is water sprinklers.” The article reports: “These sprinklers exploit the latent heat developed through freezing. Water is sprayed over the vines, which freezes in a clear film around the newly formed shoots.

Type
Chapter
Information
Riverflow
The Right to Keep Water Instream
, pp. 31 - 47
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×