Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-kpmwg Total loading time: 0.453 Render date: 2021-11-26T23:52:58.280Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

3 - Instream Rights and Dams

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 February 2021

Paul Stanton Kibel
Affiliation:
Golden Gate University School of Law
Get access

Summary

There is a tendency to think of the impacts of hydropower facilities on salmon stocks as a more recent phenomenon, as an issue that emerged in the mid-twentieth century in the period when most of the large-scale onstream dams were constructed in the United States and elsewhere. As evidenced by the quote here relating to the passage of the 1807 River Tweed Act by the British Parliament, however, the law has struggled to reconcile the interests of salmon and hydropower for more than two centuries.2

The River Tweed forms the eastern border between England and Scotland and is one of the most productive salmon and sea trout fisheries in the United Kingdom. As its name suggests, it is associated with the woolen textile mills that began to operate along the waterway in the late 1700s and the early 1800s, mills that were powered by waterwheels. The textile mills along the River Tweed were often built upland away from the river’s edge, and water was diverted to the off-stream waterwheels adjacent to the mills through instream construction of impoundments called “caulds” to collect water, which was then diverted through channels to the waterwheels and then returned downstream back to the river.

Type
Chapter
Information
Riverflow
The Right to Keep Water Instream
, pp. 48 - 65
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×