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9 - Financing Inclusive Education

Lessons from Developing Countries

from B - Substantive Issues

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2019

Gauthier de Beco
Affiliation:
University of Huddersfield
Shivaun Quinlivan
Affiliation:
National University of Ireland, Galway
Janet E. Lord
Affiliation:
Harvard Law School Project on Disability
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Summary

The right to education is a socio-economic right, subject to progressive realisation. It requires all States Parties to the CRPD to take the necessary measures to the maximum of their available resources to meet their obligations under Article 24. This chapter looks into the example of two developing countries, Tanzania and Vietnam, to analyse how they proceeded in committing their resources to fulfil the right to education. The chapter shows that while funds are in short supply in both countries, even the available resources are not efficiently used. Lack of budget lines dedicated to inclusive education, lack of disaggregated data, and rigid budgetary processes hinder the implementation of otherwise progressive educational policies. Both countries’ experiences underline that developing the educational sector without making it accessible for persons with disabilities from the beginning is not the most cost-effective solution in the long run. Therefore it is regrettable that UN human rights bodies paid little attention to the situation of children with disabilities at times when developing countries were building their education infrastructure. This approach should be remedied by the CRPD Committee, emphasising that inclusion must take place from the beginning of the education reform, and disability must be an explicit factor on all levels of policy and budget planning.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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