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Section One - Restoring Phenomenology to Psychiatry

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2015

Laurence J. Kirmayer
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
Robert Lemelson
Affiliation:
University of California, Los Angeles
Constance A. Cummings
Affiliation:
Foundation for Psychocultural Research, California
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Re-Visioning Psychiatry
Cultural Phenomenology, Critical Neuroscience, and Global Mental Health
, pp. 39 - 176
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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References

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