Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-swqlm Total loading time: 0.362 Render date: 2021-12-04T11:16:20.257Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Preface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 July 2009

Terance D. Miethe
Affiliation:
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Wendy C. Regoeczi
Affiliation:
Cleveland State University
Get access

Summary

We are exposed to a phenomenal amount of information about homicide in everyday life. It is the focus of local and national news, a primary theme in TV dramas and motion pictures, and the prime material in “true crime” magazines and the widely popular murder mystery. Homicide sells in most Western countries because of its novelty and seriousness. Although statistically the least frequently committed major crime, the public is often totally enthralled and mesmerized by homicide. This fascination with homicide is understandable given that it offends the basic values we place on human life and vulgarizes the presumed civility and moral supremacy of modern culture.

Criminologists in the social sciences are not immune to these forces. We are equally captivated and appalled by lethal violence, devoting far more attention to homicide than any other criminal act. The scientific literature on homicide is absolutely enormous. Lethal violence is an omnipresent topic in major criminological journals. Most critical tests of existing theories of crime causation and its distribution have focused on lethal violence because it is widely held that official counts of homicide are more reliable and valid than for any other major crime category. Furthermore, public policies on crime prevention and research on risk factors are disproportionately directed toward violence.

Using this vast scientific literature on lethal violence as the background, our goal in this book is to encourage “rethinking” about homicide as it relates to how we describe, explain, and study it.

Type
Chapter
Information
Rethinking Homicide
Exploring the Structure and Process Underlying Deadly Situations
, pp. xvii - xx
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×