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7 - Resilience of Information and Communication Networks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 January 2024

Alexis Kwasinski
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh
Andres Kwasinski
Affiliation:
Rochester Institute of Technology, New York
Vaidyanathan Krishnamurthy
Affiliation:
University of Pittsburgh
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Summary

This chapter is dedicated to examining technologies and strategies for improved resilience of information and communications networks. Initially, this chapter describes typical service requirements for information and communications networks by discussing services provision expectations. These expectations are presented in context by describing typical regulatory environments observed in the United States and other countries, placing special attention on emergency 911 regulations. The second part of this chapter provides an overview of most commonly observed strategies and technologies used to improve resilience. These strategies and technologies include resources management approaches, as well as hardware- and software-based technologies.

Type
Chapter
Information
Resilience Engineering for Power and Communications Systems
Networked Infrastructure in Extreme Events
, pp. 381 - 422
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2024

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