Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-t89mg Total loading time: 0.427 Render date: 2023-02-05T10:21:18.600Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

12 - Living in Poverty in Eighteenth-Century Terling

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2013

H. R. French
Affiliation:
University of Exeter
Steve Hindle
Affiliation:
Foundation Director of Research at the Huntington Library, San Marino, California
Alexandra Shepard
Affiliation:
Reader in History, University of Glasgow
John Walter
Affiliation:
Professor of History, University of Essex
Get access

Summary

Samuel Payne was baptised in the mid-Essex village of Terling on 1 August 1736, the fifth child of Robert and Mary Payne. After marrying in 1757 or 1758, he and his wife Sarah went on to have twelve children between 1759 and 1778, including (remarkably) three sets of twins: Hannah and Mary, baptised in June 1768, Joseph and John, baptised in June 1770, and Rhoda and Amelia, baptised in August 1773. This exceptional fertility left the Paynes heavily dependent on relief from the parish throughout the period. Samuel received relief during bouts of ‘sickness’ in each winter between 1767 and 1771, in the summer of 1773, the spring of 1776, and the late summer of 1781. Similarly, Sarah was incapacitated by her repeated pregnancies, requiring assistance in 1766, 1768, from March to December 1770, 1772 and 1773, and the summers of 1776 and 1778, coinciding with the birth of her last two children. By the time Samuel died, aged fifty-two, in January 1789, only nine of these children survived, but they and their mother continued to depend on occasional relief payments until at least 1801. Indeed, Sarah's son Robert followed his father, and his paternal grandfather and namesake, in sometimes requiring poor relief to support his family, as he struggled to make ends meet in the very difficult years at the turn of the nineteenth century.

Type
Chapter
Information
Remaking English Society
Social Relations and Social Change in Early Modern England
, pp. 281 - 316
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×