Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-dc8c957cd-4x6s7 Total loading time: 0.591 Render date: 2022-01-28T00:45:23.895Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Book contents

50 - Successful Aging: Optimizing Strategies for Primary Care Geriatrics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 May 2010

Christine Arenson
Affiliation:
Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia
Jan Busby-Whitehead
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Kenneth Brummel-Smith
Affiliation:
Florida State University
James G. O'Brien
Affiliation:
University of Louisville, Kentucky
Mary H. Palmer
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
William Reichel
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

Since publication of the article Geriatrics by I. L. Nascher, M.D., almost a century ago in The New York Medical Journal, the field continues to evolve in its view of the concept of aging. In 1909, Dr. Nascher coined the word geriatrics from the Greek words geras, old age, and iatrikos, relating to the physician. The field of geriatrics has since explored aging, successful aging, healthy aging, productive aging, usual aging, homeostenosis (the depletion of physiological reserves resulting from aging), frailty, and senescence. For the purposes of this chapter, we will use the word ‘successful’ interchangeably with optimal and healthy. As individuals age, how can the process of aging occur in a manner viewed as successful or healthy continues to be a topic of interest to individuals and cultures alike. The concept of successful aging implies that some age successfully whereas others do not. How one defines successful aging varies greatly by person, physician, and researcher. As Thomas Glass notes, we know little about how older people define successful aging and what they value in the quality of their life and death. Review of the literature on successful aging reveals no clear consensus as to the definition of successful aging. Although different types of aging are denoted, one finds all three descriptors used widely in the literature to represent similar ideas. Now 100 years after Dr. Nascher wrote his article, geriatricians researching this topic typically present a philosophical discussion about the interplay of aging, disease, pathology, and senescence.

Type
Chapter
Information
Reichel's Care of the Elderly
Clinical Aspects of Aging
, pp. 530 - 535
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×