Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-5dd2w Total loading time: 0.489 Render date: 2022-05-18T16:48:28.395Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Book contents

3 - Prevention for Older Adults

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 May 2010

Christine Arenson
Affiliation:
Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia
Jan Busby-Whitehead
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Kenneth Brummel-Smith
Affiliation:
Florida State University
James G. O'Brien
Affiliation:
University of Louisville, Kentucky
Mary H. Palmer
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
William Reichel
Affiliation:
Georgetown University, Washington DC
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

For many clinicians, the time taken to care for the immediate needs of elders seems to preclude the ability to address preventive care issues. For others, lack of a perceived benefit may result in missed opportunities to offer preventive care. The clinician who is motivated to learn and apply screening measures in this population will find that most studies and clinical guidelines exclude elders or make no specific recommendation for them. This chapter attempts to help the clinician identify which elders may benefit from screening and current recommendations for implementing these measures; conversely, we also attempt to advise when it is prudent to avoid screening. These recommendations have been obtained primarily from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF); we also compiled evidence from the medical literature including documentation provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Recognizably, there are significant time pressures related to patient care. Because of the frequent impracticality of addressing all screening issues at once, the authors would like the reader to consider performing ongoing assessments of their elderly patients by choosing one specific preventive measure to address at each visit.

IMMUNIZATIONS

Immunization efforts in children have been highly successful. In fact, in 1998, the CDC reported that the childhood immunization initiative goals had been met or exceeded during the previous year. Among adults, immunization efforts have been less successful; however, recently the rates of immunization in older adults have been improving significantly.

Type
Chapter
Information
Reichel's Care of the Elderly
Clinical Aspects of Aging
, pp. 31 - 38
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×