Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-7479d7b7d-k7p5g Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-14T16:55:59.606Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

Part IV - Long-term care quality systems based on data measurement and public reporting

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2014

Vincent Mor
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island
Tiziana Leone
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
Anna Maresso
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
Get access

Summary

Long-term care quality systems based on data measurement and public reporting

Quality regulation in long-term care is a governmental function rooted in the need to protect members of society who cannot advocate for themselves or who do not have enough knowledge about the services required to make informed choices. Regulation based upon inspection systems relies upon controlling who is allowed to offer services and then sanctioning those providers who do not maintain quality standards. Over the last several decades, some have advocated incorporating ‘market forces’ into healthcare by providing systematic information about the level of quality care providers attain and sustain. This information is then available for purchasers and consumers of long-term care services. Key to creating a market for quality long-term care is having a systematic approach to measuring quality that can be reliably and readily applied to all providers. Each of the countries in this segment have either moved fully into this model or have put into place a strategy for measuring long-term care clients’ outcomes, making it possible to compare the experiences of care recipients across care providers. While some of these countries may also have highly structured and proscriptive inspection-based systems, it is the measurement system and the movement towards reporting quality in a public forum that distinguishes these countries from the other case study countries in this book.

Type
Chapter
Information
Regulating Long-Term Care Quality
An International Comparison
, pp. 265 - 268
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×