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Part V - Long-term care quality systems and developing regulatory systems

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2014

Vincent Mor
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island
Tiziana Leone
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
Anna Maresso
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
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Summary

Long-term care quality systems and developing regulatory systems

The final two case study countries are still in developmental stages and have been furiously working to develop legislation, followed by guidelines that local or regional authorities can implement. The populations of both South Korea and China have been ageing rapidly, meaning that their need for formal long-term care is relatively recent and is expected to grow dramatically in the next several decades. South Korea recently enacted universal long-term care service eligibility but is still grappling with what kinds of organizations can serve recipients of this new healthcare benefit. China, which until recently had only government-operated long-term care facilities, has adopted a policy to stimulate the private sector to develop institutional long-term care by subsidizing construction and operation. This policy has been coupled with a policy of ‘light touch’ regulation meant to further encourage investment by the private sector. How these two countries develop their long-term care quality regulatory systems over the next several decades will be of considerable interest to other rapidly ageing developing countries.

Type
Chapter
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Regulating Long-Term Care Quality
An International Comparison
, pp. 383 - 384
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

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