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15 - Long-term care in China: reining in market forces through regulatory oversight

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 February 2014

Zhanlian Feng
Affiliation:
Nanjing University
Xinping Guan
Affiliation:
Nankai University
Xiaotian Feng
Affiliation:
Nanjing University
Chang Liu
Affiliation:
Duke–NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore
Heying Jenny Zhan
Affiliation:
Georgia State University
Vincent Mor
Affiliation:
Brown University
Vincent Mor
Affiliation:
Brown University, Rhode Island
Tiziana Leone
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
Anna Maresso
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
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Summary

Introduction

Traditionally, elder care in China has been confined to the familial sphere, long enshrined by the Confucian norm of filial piety. However, in recent years demographic shifts and rapid socioeconomic changes have escalated concerns about whether Chinese families will still be able to take care of a rapidly growing elderly population. These concerns are compounded by China’s one-child policy, which has been in effect for more than thirty years, further straining the capacities of family caregivers. Against this backdrop, formal long-term care services have emerged and expanded rapidly in China, a process catalysed both by government policies and private-sector initiatives.

In this chapter, we begin with an outline of the unprecedented challenges for Chinese elder care in the context of population ageing and profound socioeconomic transformations, followed by an overview of the evolving long-term care landscape in China. Next, we document the rise of formal long-term care services for the elderly, and summarize major policy efforts mounted by the Chinese government in spurring the growth of these services over the last decade. This is followed by a description of the current regulatory structure and process from the perspectives of both central and local government authorities. We conclude by highlighting the need for strengthening regulatory oversight through the building of an information infrastructure in this rapidly growing long-term care service sector.

Type
Chapter
Information
Regulating Long-Term Care Quality
An International Comparison
, pp. 409 - 444
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

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