Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-fg2fv Total loading time: 0.334 Render date: 2021-10-16T19:21:03.972Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Chapter 15 - Language in context

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Edna Amir Coffin
Affiliation:
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Shmuel Bolozky
Affiliation:
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Many grammars consider the sentence as the maximal linguistic unit for discussion. Thus sentences are often discussed and described as separate, independent entities (‘context free’), rather than parts of larger units of text. Language in context has to be considered beyond the domain of the individual sentence. It is usually a sequence of sentences (or utterances), which combine into a coherent unit, organized around a particular topic of discussion.

Language in context has its own rules. Ordinary word order and fully and well-constructed sentences give way to different language arrangements, dependent on a host of pragmatic considerations. Language utterances get their meaning not only from their formal structures, but also from the various communicative situations and contexts in which they are used, as well as from cultural conventions unique to each language. Communicative acts are conveyed in a variety of language registers by agreed upon language codes, prescribed by different communities of speakers in an array of communicative and social situations. It is important to view meaning not only through dictionary values and morphological or syntactic structures, but also as integral parts of larger texts and contexts.

The terms ‘text’ and ‘discourse’ are often used interchangeably to refer to language beyond individual sentences. Although ‘text’ is more closely associated in our minds with written materials, and ‘discourse’ with naturally occurring language, emphasizing conversation and social interaction, the distinction is generally no longer drawn today.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Language in context
  • Edna Amir Coffin, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Shmuel Bolozky, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  • Book: A Reference Grammar of Modern Hebrew
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511811081.016
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • Language in context
  • Edna Amir Coffin, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Shmuel Bolozky, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  • Book: A Reference Grammar of Modern Hebrew
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511811081.016
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Language in context
  • Edna Amir Coffin, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Shmuel Bolozky, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
  • Book: A Reference Grammar of Modern Hebrew
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511811081.016
Available formats
×