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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2014

Terrence E. Paupp
Affiliation:
Council on Hemispheric Affairs, Washington DC
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Summary

This book is dedicated to examining the greatest undiagnosed problem in international law: the failure of the nations of the Global North to accommodate, respect, and incorporate the legitimate claims of the nations of the Global South through a principled and comprehensive adherence to the legal mandates contained in the human rights to peace and development. From a historical viewpoint, it has been well established that the content of Western-dominated human rights discourse has traditionally been characterized by an overemphasis on civil and political rights, often to the exclusion of socioeconomic rights and the human right to peace. In part, this capture of the human rights discourse can be largely attributed to the inordinate dominance of the evolution of the human rights discourse by Western scholars who have – as a class – remained ideologically opposed to engaging in a reconception of the global order in some form other than that of capitalist domination by a transnational capitalist class (of which they have been the beneficiaries and proponents). Hence, in failing to even consider the claims of other human rights scholars, social movements, and changes in power relations in the world – as between the Global North and Global South – there has remained a lingering adherence to Eurocentric models, values and experiences in the dominant legal discourse of the West.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2014

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  • Introduction
  • Terrence E. Paupp
  • Book: Redefining Human Rights in the Struggle for Peace and Development
  • Online publication: 05 June 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107704947.002
Available formats
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  • Introduction
  • Terrence E. Paupp
  • Book: Redefining Human Rights in the Struggle for Peace and Development
  • Online publication: 05 June 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107704947.002
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • Terrence E. Paupp
  • Book: Redefining Human Rights in the Struggle for Peace and Development
  • Online publication: 05 June 2014
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781107704947.002
Available formats
×