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7 - Conclusion

Possibilities for Climate Justice and Planetary Co-habitation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 May 2021

Julia Dehm
Affiliation:
La Trobe University, Victoria
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Summary

The conclusion rearticulates the book's analysis and critique of how REDD+ brings forests within international financial flows by commodifying the sequestered carbon emissions saved from avoided deforestation or other forms of forest degradation in the Global South; and by potentially allowing ‘saved’ emissions to be used as an ‘offset’ towards the GHG reduction targets of the Global North. In these processes, new claims to international authority have been authorised and articulated, although these remain in many ways provisional and aspirational. It describes forests both materially and metaphorically as productive sites for the examination of questions of authority and the process of authorisation, because they have physically and symbolically been sites of contested authority. In closing, it gestures towards other possible ways we could live in and with nature, how we could live in relation with one another and how we could form worlds and our place in them.

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Chapter
Information
Reconsidering REDD+
Authority, Power and Law in the Green Economy
, pp. 351 - 356
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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  • Conclusion
  • Julia Dehm, La Trobe University, Victoria
  • Book: Reconsidering REDD+
  • Online publication: 13 May 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108529341.008
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  • Conclusion
  • Julia Dehm, La Trobe University, Victoria
  • Book: Reconsidering REDD+
  • Online publication: 13 May 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108529341.008
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusion
  • Julia Dehm, La Trobe University, Victoria
  • Book: Reconsidering REDD+
  • Online publication: 13 May 2021
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108529341.008
Available formats
×