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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 May 2021

Julia Dehm
Affiliation:
La Trobe University, Victoria
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Summary

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Reconsidering REDD+
Authority, Power and Law in the Green Economy
, pp. 357 - 410
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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