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8 - Reciprocity-Informed Policy Design

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2019

Adam Oliver
Affiliation:
London School of Economics and Political Science
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Summary

This chapter offers some suggestions on how reciprocity might be used to justify specific policy directions. For instance, so long as salaries remain the predominant form of remuneration for public sector employees, performance incentives – both positive and negative – might be beneficial so long as all parties accept that the chosen indicators of good and bad performance are appropriate and deem the corresponding performance-related compensation/penalties as fair. Moreover, insofar as reciprocity is entwined with reputational concerns, a reputational model of governance that threatens to punish bad absolute performance and that supports the implementation of good practice is recommended. Relatedly, group selection theory implies that providing the conditions for reputational competition across regions in relation to public sector services may incentivise cooperation and more innovation within each region, generating lessons that could be shared across regions. Furthermore, given that people naturally reciprocate, framing messages with this fundamental motivational force is worthy of consideration when trying to secure individual behaviour change.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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  • Reciprocity-Informed Policy Design
  • Adam Oliver, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Book: Reciprocity and the Art of Behavioural Public Policy
  • Online publication: 06 July 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108647755.008
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  • Reciprocity-Informed Policy Design
  • Adam Oliver, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Book: Reciprocity and the Art of Behavioural Public Policy
  • Online publication: 06 July 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108647755.008
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Reciprocity-Informed Policy Design
  • Adam Oliver, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Book: Reciprocity and the Art of Behavioural Public Policy
  • Online publication: 06 July 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108647755.008
Available formats
×