Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-6mft8 Total loading time: 0.268 Render date: 2021-10-18T18:36:35.369Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }
Coming soon

8 - Victorian Pantomime Libretti and the Reading Audience

Jill A. Sullivan
Affiliation:
University of Exeter
Get access

Summary

The nineteenth-century pantomime was a complex theatrical event. Each production ran for several months and whilst as a genre it was continually developing, responding to popular taste, and incorporating new theatrical trends and technological developments, its complexity lay in the additional mutability of the individual performances of any one production. Pantomime success relied on regular changes during a run, for example, updating topical references, adding new jokes and physical comic ‘business’ or introducing new novelty acts. Success also depended (as it still does) on a successful and participatory engagement with each audience.

Over the last twenty years there has been an increasing body of work that addresses the concept and definition of an audience and, more especially, the role that that audience plays during a theatrical performance. Those discussions invariably address the relationship of the audience with a performance text, that which has been created by a multiple authorship of directors, designers and performers, plus the audience themselves in terms of responses and reactions. Audience responses are therefore addressed primarily in relation to a predominantly verbal, visualized spectacle. For theorists writing on recent productions, audience responses can be researched via reports but also, advantageously, in direct interviews with audience members. For the historian of the theatre, establishing audiences for past productions is a more problematic issue and yet we still acknowledge the essential difference between an author's text (the initial written dramatic text) and a performance text, always assuming that those distant theatre audiences were responding to a transient performance: the visual not the written text.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Pickering & Chatto
First published in: 2014

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×