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The Power of Rhetoric

from Part II - Contact with a Living Culture

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 September 2018

Teresa Shawcross
Affiliation:
Princeton University, New Jersey
Ida Toth
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

Further Reading

The key source is: Walz, C., ed., ‘Ἐξήγησις εἰς τὰς Ἰδέας τοῦ Ἑρμογένους ἀπὸ φωνῆς Ἰωάννου φιλοσόφου τοῦ Σικελιώτου’ in Rhetores graeci ex codicibus Florentinis, Mediolanensibus, Monacensibus, Neapolitanis, Parisiensibus, Romanis, Venetis, Taurinensibus et Vindobonensibus (Stuttgart, 1834), vol. vi, 56504. Relevant studies include: T. M. Conley, ‘Demosthenes Dethroned: Gregory Nazianzus in Sikeliotes’ Scholia on Hermogenes’ Περὶ Ἰδεῶν’, ICS, 27/28 (2002–3), 145–52; G. Kustas, Studies in Byzantine Rhetoric (Thessalonike, 1973); P. Roilos, Amphoteroglossia: A Poetics of the Twelfth-century Medieval Greek Novel (Cambridge, MA, 2005) and ‘Phantasia and the Ethics of Fictionality in Byzantium: A Cognitive Anthropological Perspective’ in P. Roilos, ed., Medieval Greek Storytelling: Fictionality and Narrative in Byzantium (Wiesbaden, 2014), 9–30.Google Scholar

Further Reading

The key primary source is: Flusin, B. and Cheynet, J.-C., trans., Jean Skylitzès. Empereurs de Constantinople (Paris, 2003). Relevant studies include: C. Roueché, ‘The Rhetoric of Kekaumenos’ in E. M. Jeffreys, ed., Rhetoric in Byzantium (Aldershot, 2003), 23–37; E. M. Jeffreys, ‘Rhetoric in Byzantium’ in I. Worthington, ed., A Companion to Greek Rhetoric (Oxford, 2007), 166–84; M. J. Jeffreys, ‘Psellos and “His Emperors”: Fact, Fiction and Genre’ in R. Macrides, ed., History as Literature in Byzantium (Farnham, 2010), 73–91; J. Shepard, ‘A Suspected Source of Scylitzes’ Synopsis Historion: the Great Catacalon Cecaumenus’, BMGS, 16 (1992), 171–81.Google Scholar

Further Reading

Key studies include: Alexander, J. C., ‘Cultural Pragmatics: Social Performance Between Ritual and Strategy’ in Alexander, J. C., Giesen, B. and Mast, J. L., eds., Social Performance: Symbolic Action, Cultural Pragmatics, and Ritual (Cambridge, 2006), 2990; E. C. Bourbouhakis, ‘Rhetoric and Performance’ in P. Stephenson, The Byzantine World (London, 2010), 175–87 and E. C. Bourbouhakis, ‘The End of ἐπίδειξις. Authorial Identity and Authorial Intention in Michael Choniates’ Πρὸς τοὺς αἰτιωμένους τὸ ἀφιλένδεικτον’ in A. Pizzone, ed., The Author in Middle Byzantine Literature. Modes, Functions, Identities (Berlin, 2014), 201–24; N. Gaul, ‘The Letter in the Theatron: Epistolary Voice, Character, Soul and their Audience’ in A. Riehle, ed., A Companion to Byzantine Epistolography (Leiden, forthcoming); I. Toth, ‘Rhetorical Theatron in Late Byzantium: the Example of Palaiologan Imperial Orations’ in M. Grünbart, ed., Theatron: Rhetorische Kultur in Spätantike und Mittelalter (Berlin, 2007), 429–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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