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Introduction to Books, Readers and Reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 September 2018

Teresa Shawcross
Affiliation:
Princeton University, New Jersey
Ida Toth
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

An edition of all of Photios’ book reviews can be found in Henry, R., ed., Photius. Bibliothèque, 8 vols. (Paris, 1959–91). Introductory studies of books, readers and reading include: W. C. Loerke et al., Byzantine Books and Bookmen: A Dumbarton Oaks Colloquium (Washington, D. C., 1975); C. Holmes and J. Waring, eds., Literacy, Education and Manuscript Transmission in Byzantium and Beyond (Leiden, 2002); G. Cavallo, Lire à Byzance, P. Odorico and A. Segonds, trans. (Paris, 2006); B. Mondrain, Lire et écrire à Byzance (Paris, 2006).Google Scholar
An important source on the Byzantines’ theory of reading is Uhlig, G., ed., Dionysios Thrax, Ars grammatica, in Uhlig, G. and Hilgard, A., eds., Grammatici Graeci (Leipzig 1883), vol. i.1, 5100. For key studies of reading practices, see P. A. Agapitos, ‘Writing, Reading and Reciting (in) Byzantine Erotic Fiction’ in B. Mondrain, ed., Lire et écrire à Byzance (Paris, 2006), 125–76; K. Bentein and K. Demoen, ‘The Reader in Eleventh-century Epigrams’ in F. Bernard and K. Demoen, eds., Poetry and Its Contexts in Eleventh-century Byzantium (Farnham, 2012), 69–88; D. R. Reinsch, ‘Der Autor ist tot – es lebe der Leser; Zur Neubewertung der imitatio in der byzantinischen Geschichtsschreibung’ in A. Rhoby and E. Schiffer, eds., Imitatio – Aemulatio – Variatio (Vienna, 2010), 23–32; and V. Valiavitcharska, Rhetoric and Rhythm in Byzantium (Cambridge, 2013).Google Scholar
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