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Selected Works Cited

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 August 2022

Matthew Hunter
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Texas Tech University
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The Pursuit of Style in Early Modern Drama
Forms of Talk on the London Stage
, pp. 238 - 250
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Selected Works Cited
  • Matthew Hunter, Texas Tech University
  • Book: The Pursuit of Style in Early Modern Drama
  • Online publication: 26 August 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009042345.008
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  • Selected Works Cited
  • Matthew Hunter, Texas Tech University
  • Book: The Pursuit of Style in Early Modern Drama
  • Online publication: 26 August 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009042345.008
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  • Selected Works Cited
  • Matthew Hunter, Texas Tech University
  • Book: The Pursuit of Style in Early Modern Drama
  • Online publication: 26 August 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009042345.008
Available formats
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