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Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 September 2021

Zoë Laidlaw
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University of Melbourne
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Protecting the Empire's Humanity
Thomas Hodgkin and British Colonial Activism 1830–1870
, pp. 334 - 358
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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