Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-489z4 Total loading time: 0.478 Render date: 2022-05-25T11:15:42.302Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

2 - Prosecutions of Heads of State in Europe

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 August 2009

Caitlin Reiger
Affiliation:
International Center for Transitional Justice, New York
Get access

Summary

Europe has had a long tradition of calling for criminal prosecutions of senior officials for grave crimes committed while in office. Since the end of the Cold War, the “justice norm” has become further embedded. Europeans' willingness to try their own leaders is illustrated in several lines of cases: (1) the prosecutions of aging former Nazi officials for crimes they committed during World War II; (2) the prosecutions of former Eastern European leaders for Cold War–era crimes; (3) the Slobodan Milošević trial (and related trials) in the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and subsequent domestic and international trials of perpetrators involved in war crimes and crimes against humanity in the former Yugoslav countries; and (4) the prosecutions of heads of state and other top government officials on corruption charges. In addition, Western European countries have opened their courts to trials of perpetrators of genocide, crimes against humanity, and other serious human rights violations from Argentina, Chile, the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and numerous other countries. Almost all of the countries of Eastern and Western Europe are members of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and to regional and international human rights and anticorruption treaties; in addition, most have conformed their domestic legislation to the ICC statute's provisions.

EUROPEAN ANTECEDENTS TO CONTEMPORARY TRIALS OF POLITICAL LEADERS

Even before the end of World War I, there was intense Allied interest in trying German leaders responsible for war crimes.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×