Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-684899dbb8-ct24h Total loading time: 0.365 Render date: 2022-05-25T10:11:23.832Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Foreword

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 August 2009

Caitlin Reiger
Affiliation:
International Center for Transitional Justice, New York
Get access

Summary

One of the most important developments in the slow but determined journey of the international community toward a system of justice and accountability is the increasing acceptance of the duty to prosecute those responsible for mass human rights violations, regardless of rank or position. The historical unspoken presumption that heads of state may act with impunity has finally begun to crumble, but progress continues to be extremely difficult, unsteady, and hard fought.

The strong and conflicting reactions in Sudan and elsewhere to the request by the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court for the arrest of President Omar Hassan Ahmad al-Bashir of Sudan, and the response in Bosnia and Herzegovina to the arrest of Radovan Karadžić, show the political sensitivities that can become significant bumps in the road.

It is important that the lessons learned on this difficult journey are available to us all. However, until now there has been no detailed review of major attempts at bringing national leaders to justice.

Prosecuting Heads of State fills this void and is a fascinating and readable account of efforts to bring senior political leaders to justice for human rights and financial crimes. It considers the background and political circumstances that have enabled these cases to proceed and the effect they have had on transitions to peace and democracy in the countries concerned.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×