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2 - Peace and Security

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 April 2020

Kiran Klaus Patel
Affiliation:
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munchen
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Summary

The EU often claims to play a central role for peace in Europe. To date astonishingly little research has systematically addressed this issue; the dominant narrative is essentially that cast by the protagonists of the integration process themselves. This chapter argues that the European integration process was initially much more a beneficiary of the European peace settlement, than shaping it in any significant sense. At the same time it is important to distinguish between three concepts of peace: reconciliation between the member states and especially between the ‘arch-enemies’ France and Germany; the EC’s contribution to peace in a world largely defined by the Cold War; and finally social peace within the member states. The chapter examines these three dimensions and argues that the EC was particularly important with regard to the third of these categories. Later and in different forms than we normally assume – this is how the EU really contributed to peace over the past decades.

Type
Chapter
Information
Project Europe
A History
, pp. 50 - 83
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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  • Peace and Security
  • Kiran Klaus Patel, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munchen
  • Book: Project Europe
  • Online publication: 24 April 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108848893.003
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  • Peace and Security
  • Kiran Klaus Patel, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munchen
  • Book: Project Europe
  • Online publication: 24 April 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108848893.003
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Peace and Security
  • Kiran Klaus Patel, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munchen
  • Book: Project Europe
  • Online publication: 24 April 2020
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108848893.003
Available formats
×