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22 - Malta

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2013

Max Ganado
Affiliation:
Ganado & Associates, Advocates
Christine Borg
Affiliation:
Ganado & Associates, Advocates
Thomas Cutts-Watson
Affiliation:
Ganado & Associates, Advocates
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Summary

Preliminary note

Under Maltese law, a person can only exercise the profession of advocate if he or she has a warrant granted by the president of Malta. A person is only entitled to obtain this warrant if he is of good conduct and good morals; is a citizen of Malta or of a Member State of the European Union or is otherwise permitted to work in Malta under any law; has obtained the academic degree of doctor of law from the University of Malta or a comparable degree from another competent authority, having studied law in Malta or in a Member State; has regularly attended, for a period of not less than one year, at the office of a practising advocate of the Bar of Malta, and at the sittings of the superior courts; possesses a full knowledge of the Maltese language which is the language of the courts; and has been duly examined and approved by two judges who shall issue a certificate attesting that they have found him to possess the qualifications above-mentioned and that he is competent to exercise the profession of advocate in the courts of Malta.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2013

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References

Schonenberger and Durmax v. Switzerland (Court (Chamber) dated 20 June 1988)
[Application no 11368/85]; Campbell v. The United Kingdom (Court (Chamber) dated 25 March 1992)
[Application no 13590/88]; Niemietz v. Germany (Court (Chamber) dated 16 December 1992)
[Application no 13710/88]; Foxley v. The United Kingdom (Court (Third Section, Chamber) dated 20 June 2000)
Ganado, Max and Saydon, Henry, ‘Confidentiality’, in An Introduction to Maltese Financial Services Laws, Malta: Allied Publications, 2009Google Scholar

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