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Chapter 13 - Human Factors in Maternity Care

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 October 2018

Tahir Mahmood
Affiliation:
Victoria Hospital, Kirkcaldy, Fife, UK
Sambit Mukhopadhyay
Affiliation:
Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

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House of Commons Health Committee, Patient Safety. Vol. 1. London: The Stationery Office, 2009.
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Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), Each Baby Key Messages from 2015. London: RCOG, 2016.
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Ruggiero, J. S. and Redeker, N. S., Effects of napping on sleepiness and sleep-related performance deficits in night shift workers: a systematic review. Biological Research for Nursing 16(2), 2013: 134142.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Siassakos, D., Hasafa, Z., Sibanda, T., Fox, R., Donald, F., Winter, C. et al., Retrospective cohort study of diagnosis-delivery interval with umbilical cord prolapse: the effect of team training. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 116(8), 2009: 10891096.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Haynes, A. B., Weiser, T. G., Berry, W. R. et al., A surgical safety checklist to reduce morbidity and mortality in a global population. New England Journal of Medicine 360(5), 2009: 491499.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hickson, G. B., Obstetricians’ prior malpractice experience and patients’ satisfaction with care. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association 272(20),1994: 15831587.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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Maslovitz, S., Barkai, G., Lessing, J. B., Ziv, A. and Many, A., Recurrent obstetric management mistakes identified by simulation. Obstetrics and Gynecology 109(6), 2007: 12951300.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Andreasen, S., Backe, B., Jørstad, R. and Øian, P., A nationwide descriptive study of obstetric claims for compensation in Norway. Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 91(10), 2012: 11911195.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kohn, L. T., To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 2009.Google Scholar
House of Commons Health Committee, Patient Safety. Vol. 1. London: The Stationery Office, 2009.
Smith, A., Dixon, A. and Page, L., Healthcare professionals’ views about safety in maternity services: a qualitative study. Midwifery 25(1), 2009: 2131.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bill, K., The Report of the Morecambe Bay Investigation. 2015.
Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG), Each Baby Key Messages from 2015. London: RCOG, 2016.
Knight, M., Key messages from the UK and Ireland Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Death and Morbidity 2016. Obstetrician and Gynaecologist 17(1), 2015: 7273.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Samkoff Jacques, C., A review of studies concerning effects of sleep deprivation and fatigue on residentsʼ performance. Academic Medicine 66(11), 1991: 687693.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Williamson, A., Moderate sleep deprivation produces impairments in cognitive and motor performance equivalent to legally prescribed levels of alcohol intoxication. Occupational and Environmental Medicine 57(10), 2000: 649655.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Driscoll, T., Grunstein, R. and Rogers, N., A systematic review of the neurobehavioural and physiological effects of shiftwork systems. Sleep Medicine Reviews 11(3), 2007: 179194.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hobson, J., Shift work and doctors’ health. BMJ Careers, 9 October 2004 [accessed 30 December 2016]. Available at http://careers.bmj.com/careers/advice/view-article.html?id=468.
Ruggiero, J. S. and Redeker, N. S., Effects of napping on sleepiness and sleep-related performance deficits in night shift workers: a systematic review. Biological Research for Nursing 16(2), 2013: 134142.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Siassakos, D., Hasafa, Z., Sibanda, T., Fox, R., Donald, F., Winter, C. et al., Retrospective cohort study of diagnosis-delivery interval with umbilical cord prolapse: the effect of team training. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 116(8), 2009: 10891096.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Haynes, A. B., Weiser, T. G., Berry, W. R. et al., A surgical safety checklist to reduce morbidity and mortality in a global population. New England Journal of Medicine 360(5), 2009: 491499.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hickson, G. B., Obstetricians’ prior malpractice experience and patients’ satisfaction with care. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association 272(20),1994: 15831587.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burden, C., Bradley, S., Storey, C., Ellis, A., Heazell, A. E. P., Downe, S. et al., From grief, guilt pain and stigma to hope and pride: a systematic review and meta-analysis of mixed-method research of the psychosocial impact of stillbirth. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 16(1), 2016: 9.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Maslovitz, S., Barkai, G., Lessing, J. B., Ziv, A. and Many, A., Recurrent obstetric management mistakes identified by simulation. Obstetrics and Gynecology 109(6), 2007: 12951300.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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