Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-sjtt6 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-25T00:24:15.324Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 July 2009

Huw Beverley-Smith
Affiliation:
Field Fisher Waterhouse, London
Ansgar Ohly
Affiliation:
Universität Bayreuth, Germany
Agnes Lucas-Schloetter
Affiliation:
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munchen
Get access

Summary

The commercial value of aspects of personality

Fame has an attractive force that lends itself well to commercial exploitation. Attributes of an individual's personality, such as a person's name, voice or likeness, are often used in advertising or merchandising in order to increase the attractiveness and saleability of goods and services. The practice is not new and dates from at least the nineteenth century. Since the advent of the industrial revolution and the increased proliferation of consumer products, advertisers and merchandisers sought new ways to draw the consuming public's attention and to differentiate their products and services from those of their rivals. In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the names and images of well-known persons such as the French actress Sarah Bernhardt, German Count Zeppelin and the American inventor Thomas A. Edison were used to advertise, respectively, perfumes, cigars and medicinal products. Moreover, people with no obvious public profile began to find indicia of their identity used in advertising, resulting in varying degrees of distress, annoyance or indignation.

This reflects the fact that manufacturers of goods and suppliers of services can find the use of the images of a vast range of people beneficial to them in some way. Apart from the more common modern examples such as pop-stars and sportsmen, people of high professional standing, holders of public office, and politicians are often desirable people with whom to associate products or services.

Type
Chapter
Information
Privacy, Property and Personality
Civil Law Perspectives on Commercial Appropriation
, pp. 1 - 12
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2005

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×