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References

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 October 2022

Peter E. Earl
Affiliation:
University of Queensland
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Principles of Behavioral Economics
Bringing Together Old, New and Evolutionary Approaches
, pp. 470 - 498
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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References

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