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Chapter Four - Applicable Laws and Rules

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

Margaret L. Moses
Affiliation:
Loyola University, Chicago
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Summary

IMPORTANCE OF THE LAW

How important is the law in international commercial arbitration? That may depend on the particular case. In some arbitrations, the arbitrators’ task will be primarily to understand the facts and to apply the contract terms to the facts. Procedural issues will be resolved in accordance with the rules chosen by the parties. Legal questions may not be raised or argued. In other arbitrations, difficult or technical legal questions may be at the core of the dispute.

Although party autonomy is an important element of arbitration, nonetheless, the parties’ contract, and their dispute, do not exist in a legal vacuum. Layers of laws and rules may be applicable, and complications may increase when more than one national law may properly apply to the arbitration. Typically, the parties will choose a law to govern the contract. This law, which is the substantive law, is likely to be the national law of one of the parties. Or, in a contract for the sale of goods, it could be an international law such as the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG).

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2012

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References

Paulsson, JanDelocalisation of International Commercial Arbitration: When and Why It Matters 32 1983
Kaufmann-Kohler, Gabrielle 1997
Roy, GoodeThe Role of the Lex Loci Arbitri in International Commercial Arbitration 17 21 2001
Berger, Klaus PeterDubberstein, HolgerLehmann, SaschaPetzold, Viktoria 2005
Yves Fortier, L.The New, New Lex Mercatoria, or, Back to the Future 17 2001
Emmanuel, GaillardTransnational Law: A Legal System or a Method of Decision Making? 17 59 2001
Roy, GoodeThe Role of the Lex Loci Arbitri in International Commercial Arbitration 17 2001
Antonis, PatrikiosResolution of Cross-Border E-Business Disputes by Arbitration Tribunals: The Emergence of the Lex Informatica 38 2006
Wortmann, Dr. BedaChoice of Law by Arbitrators: The Applicable Conflict of Laws System 14 1998
Moses, Margaret L.Statutory Misconstruction: How the Supreme Court Created a Federal Arbitration Law Never Enacted by Congress 34 2006
Marc, BlessingThe Law Applicable to the Arbitration ClauseParis 1999 169Google Scholar
Pierre, MayerThe Limits of Severability of the Arbitration ClauseParis 1999Google Scholar
Howsam v, 2002
Homayoon, ArfazadehArbitrability under the New York Convention: The Lex Fori Revisited 17 2001
Derains, Schwartz, 2005
Zhang, Mo 2006
Lookofsky, Joseph 2004
BondHow to Draft an Arbitration Clause (Revisited) 74 2005
Emmanuel, GaillardTransnational Law: A Legal System of a Method of Decision Making? 17 2001
Blessing, 1996
Lew, 2003
Keer, StephanieNaimark, Richard 2005
Pierre, MayerReflections on the International Arbitrator's Duty to Apply the Law 17 2001
Bond, 2005
Derains & Schwartz 2005
Martin, PlatteAn Arbitrator's Duty to Render Enforceable Awards 20 2003
von Mehren, Robert B.The Eco-Swiss Case and International Arbitration 19 2003

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  • Applicable Laws and Rules
  • Margaret L. Moses, Loyola University, Chicago
  • Book: The Principles and Practice of International Commercial Arbitration
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511920073.006
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  • Applicable Laws and Rules
  • Margaret L. Moses, Loyola University, Chicago
  • Book: The Principles and Practice of International Commercial Arbitration
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511920073.006
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Applicable Laws and Rules
  • Margaret L. Moses, Loyola University, Chicago
  • Book: The Principles and Practice of International Commercial Arbitration
  • Online publication: 05 June 2012
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511920073.006
Available formats
×