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Chapter 36 - Clinical potential of in vitro maturation

from Section 8 - In vitro follicle growth and maturation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 February 2011

Jacques Donnez
Affiliation:
Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium
S. Samuel Kim
Affiliation:
University of Kansas
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Summary

Currently available options for preservation of female fertility are cryopreservation of oocytes or embryos following in vitro fertilization (IVF) or in vitro maturation (IVM) or cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. While IVF involves collection and in vitro fertilization of multiple in-vivo matured oocytes collected at the metaphase-II stage (MII), the IVM technique aims to make use of the multiple immature oocytes that already exist in the ovaries of a reproductive-aged woman. The time required for completion of the fertility preservation procedure, which starts with the initial reproductive medicine consultation and technically ends with oocyte collection, depends on the conditions of any particular clinic. In addition to avoiding potential delay in treatment and rise in estradiol levels, IVM eliminates the risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). IVM combined with embryo or oocyte vitrification provides previously unavailable options for some patients and improves the services provided by a fertility preservation program.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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