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28 - Traumatic Brain Injury

from SECTION IV - NEUROLOGICAL TRAUMA

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 August 2009

Christopher Carpenter
Affiliation:
Departments of Emergency and Internal Medicine University St. Louis, Missouri
Kevin Gingrich
Affiliation:
Department of Anesthesiology Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
James E. Wilberger
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology Allegheny General Hospital Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Lee Warren
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology Wildford Hall Air Force Medical Center San Antonio, Texas
Sid M. Shah
Affiliation:
Assistant Clinical Professor Michigan State University
Sid M. Shah
Affiliation:
Michigan State University
Kevin M. Kelly
Affiliation:
Drexel University, Philadelphia
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Summary

Patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have normal neurological and physical examinations. Mild traumatic brain injury is not always clinically apparent. The findings include: any period of loss of consciousness, amnesia of the event, and change in mental status such as feeling dizzy or disoriented. Focal motor findings in the unconscious patient with TBI can localize intracranial lesions or spinal cord injuries. Noncontrast computerized tomography (CT) provides useful anatomical and pathological information regarding the location, extent, and nature of the TBI within minutes. Although available evidence does not show that prevention of early posttraumatic seizures improves outcomes following TBI, anticonvulsants are an option in patients at high risk for seizures following head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale less than 9). TBI is the cause of death in approximately 40% of childhood injuries, and occurs more frequently in males and infants or adolescents.
Type
Chapter
Information
Principles and Practice of Emergency Neurology
Handbook for Emergency Physicians
, pp. 279 - 285
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

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References

Aubry, M, Cantu, R, Dvorak, J, Graf-Baumann, T, Johnston, K, Kelly, J, Lovell, M, McCrory, P, Meeuwisse, W, Schamasch, P. Summary and agreement statement of the first international conference on concussion in sport, Vienna 2001: Recommendations for the improvement of safety and health of athletes who may suffer concussive injuries. (concussion in sport). British Journal of Sports Medicine. Feb 2002; 36: 1–6Google Scholar
Biros M H, Heegaard W. Head. In: Rosen P. et al., eds. Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice, 5th ed. St. Louis: Mosby: 2002: 298

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  • Traumatic Brain Injury
    • By Christopher Carpenter, Departments of Emergency and Internal Medicine University St. Louis, Missouri, Kevin Gingrich, Department of Anesthesiology Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, James E. Wilberger, Department of Neurology Allegheny General Hospital Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Lee Warren, Department of Neurology Wildford Hall Air Force Medical Center San Antonio, Texas, Sid M. Shah, Assistant Clinical Professor Michigan State University
  • Edited by Sid M. Shah, Michigan State University, Kevin M. Kelly, Drexel University, Philadelphia
  • Book: Principles and Practice of Emergency Neurology
  • Online publication: 06 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511547256.029
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  • Traumatic Brain Injury
    • By Christopher Carpenter, Departments of Emergency and Internal Medicine University St. Louis, Missouri, Kevin Gingrich, Department of Anesthesiology Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, James E. Wilberger, Department of Neurology Allegheny General Hospital Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Lee Warren, Department of Neurology Wildford Hall Air Force Medical Center San Antonio, Texas, Sid M. Shah, Assistant Clinical Professor Michigan State University
  • Edited by Sid M. Shah, Michigan State University, Kevin M. Kelly, Drexel University, Philadelphia
  • Book: Principles and Practice of Emergency Neurology
  • Online publication: 06 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511547256.029
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Traumatic Brain Injury
    • By Christopher Carpenter, Departments of Emergency and Internal Medicine University St. Louis, Missouri, Kevin Gingrich, Department of Anesthesiology Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, James E. Wilberger, Department of Neurology Allegheny General Hospital Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Lee Warren, Department of Neurology Wildford Hall Air Force Medical Center San Antonio, Texas, Sid M. Shah, Assistant Clinical Professor Michigan State University
  • Edited by Sid M. Shah, Michigan State University, Kevin M. Kelly, Drexel University, Philadelphia
  • Book: Principles and Practice of Emergency Neurology
  • Online publication: 06 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511547256.029
Available formats
×