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13 - Movement Disorders

from SECTION III - SPECIFIC NEUROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 August 2009

Sid M. Shah
Affiliation:
Assistant Clinical Professor Michigan State University
Roger Albin
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan
Susan Baser
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology Allegheny General Hospital Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Sid M. Shah
Affiliation:
Michigan State University
Kevin M. Kelly
Affiliation:
Drexel University, Philadelphia
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Summary

Movement disorders (MD) encountered in the emergency department (ED) range from the familiar Parkinsonism and drug-induced dystonias to rare disabling hemiballism secondary to a stroke. Movement disorders can be classified into four broad categories based on phenomenological features, clinical pharmacology, and neuropathology. It includes hypokinetic disorders identical to Parkinsonism's syndrome, hyperkinetic/choreic movement disorders, tremors, and myoclonus. The cause-and-effect relationship between the drug and the movement disorder is poorly understood, but preexisting central nervous system (CNS) pathology likely predisposes to the development of movement disorders. Commonly prescribed medications that result in movement disorders include antiepileptics, neuroleptics, stimulants, oral contraceptives, antihistaminics and anticholinergics, and antidepressants. The use of monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors is associated with tremors and less often with myoclonic jerks. Tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline, imipramine, and nortriptyline cause choreiform movements infrequently, particularly orofacial dyskinesia.
Type
Chapter
Information
Principles and Practice of Emergency Neurology
Handbook for Emergency Physicians
, pp. 146 - 160
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

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References

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  • Movement Disorders
    • By Sid M. Shah, Assistant Clinical Professor Michigan State University, Roger Albin, Department of Neurology University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan, Susan Baser, Department of Neurology Allegheny General Hospital Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Edited by Sid M. Shah, Michigan State University, Kevin M. Kelly, Drexel University, Philadelphia
  • Book: Principles and Practice of Emergency Neurology
  • Online publication: 06 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511547256.014
Available formats
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  • Movement Disorders
    • By Sid M. Shah, Assistant Clinical Professor Michigan State University, Roger Albin, Department of Neurology University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan, Susan Baser, Department of Neurology Allegheny General Hospital Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Edited by Sid M. Shah, Michigan State University, Kevin M. Kelly, Drexel University, Philadelphia
  • Book: Principles and Practice of Emergency Neurology
  • Online publication: 06 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511547256.014
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Movement Disorders
    • By Sid M. Shah, Assistant Clinical Professor Michigan State University, Roger Albin, Department of Neurology University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan, Susan Baser, Department of Neurology Allegheny General Hospital Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Edited by Sid M. Shah, Michigan State University, Kevin M. Kelly, Drexel University, Philadelphia
  • Book: Principles and Practice of Emergency Neurology
  • Online publication: 06 August 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511547256.014
Available formats
×