Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-6c8bd87754-trcsx Total loading time: 1.4 Render date: 2022-01-16T11:33:58.282Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

7 - Legitimate Rule and the Balance of Power

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 March 2020

Erika Graham-Goering
Affiliation:
Ghent University
Get access

Summary

While the defence of princely legitimacy had to respond to certain legal and social standards, this technical reality did not act as a fixed template for its eventual performance. This chapter examines the practical and rhetorical aspects of three components of Jeanne’s legitimacy over the course of her whole career: her status as the rightful heiress of Brittany, her exercise of princely rights and responsibilities, and her responses to the disunity of the duchy. Although Jeanne’s claims were rooted in broadly accepted social expectations, not only could her assertions of legitimacy diverge from those of her husband and her predecessors, but she foregrounded different aspects of her status before different audiences; at the same time, other aspects of her official position remained constant even across the major shifts in her political circumstances. Recognizing princely legitimacy as a moving target expands our understanding of what constituted an effective response to a position of weakness, and tempers the ‘ideal’ prince of medieval (and modern) theory with constructions of power more adaptive to the concurrent pressures of princely relationships and authority.

Type
Chapter
Information
Princely Power in Late Medieval France
Jeanne de Penthièvre and the War for Brittany
, pp. 217 - 256
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×