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1 - Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 August 2009

John Cartwright
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Martijn Hesselink
Affiliation:
Universiteit van Amsterdam
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Summary

The Common Core Project

Aim and method

Aim

The present volume forms part of a project that started in Trento in 1993 and has produced, so far, ten similar volumes. The aim of the Common Core Project has been defined, and refined, by the general editors of the project, Mauro Bussani and Ugo Mattei, on several occasions. The main aim is legal cartography, that is, to draw a reliable map of private law in Europe:

the Common Core Project is seeking to unearth the common core of the bulk of European Private Law … The search is for what is different and what is already common behind the various private laws of European Union Member States … Such a common core is to be revealed in order to obtain at least the main lines of one reliable geographical map of the law of Europe.

The research project is meant to be neutral, without any specific agenda for or against further Europeanisation of private law, whether or not through codification. As Bussani and Mattei put it, ‘We are not drafting a city plan for something that will develop in the future and that we wish to affect. This project seeks only to analyze the present complex situation in a reliable way.’ This also means that the legal systems of the Member States are treated on an equal basis; no relations between legal systems, hierarchical or in terms of ‘legal families’, are assumed.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2009

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