Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768dbb666b-7lw58 Total loading time: 0.555 Render date: 2023-02-03T00:10:52.861Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Preface and acknowledgements

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 August 2009

Stan Kutcher
Affiliation:
Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia
Get access

Summary

The field of child and adolescent psychopharmacology is rapidly growing and every clinician, physician, and other health provider alike must be informed of new directions and applications in the use of medications as they pertain to the treatment of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. To date, considerable research has been conducted which can properly direct the use of a variety of psychotropic compounds in a number of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders. In particular, well-established and effective pharmacologic treatments are available for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and Tourette's syndrome. Less well-established but nonetheless frequently applied pharmacotherapies are used to treat a variety of psychiatric illness (such as major depression, schizophrenia, bipolar mania) or specific symptoms which may occur independently or as a component of a particular psychiatric diagnosis – such as aggression in pervasive developmental disorder.

Evidence and experience to date clearly indicates that psychopharmacologic treatments for children and teenagers cannot be extrapolated from studies conducted in adult patients. Young people have a different central nervous system development, exhibit different cognitive, behavioral, and affective “norms” and are exposed to different environmental influences. All of these factors can influence the response to pharmacologic treatments – efficacy as well as tolerability. Thus, the study and practice of pharmacologic treatments of child and adolescent psychiatric disorders must become a special and significant area in its own right.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2002

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×