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Conclusions to Part III

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 November 2009

Olga F. Linares
Affiliation:
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama
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Summary

The Jola of Kalunay are adapting a multitude of foreign practices to their own needs. No less than the native Jola religion, Islam developed in dialectical relationship with novel economic and social pursuits. To attempt to identify foreign, as opposed to indigenous, traits, is a sterile exercise; they evolved together, as a coherent cultural whole. With Islam as the legitimating idiom, the Kalunay Jola have adopted a particular Manding pattern of social relations that emphasizes descent, gender, and relative age. Yet these transformations did not occur in isolation. They are part of an emergent social system characterized by patron–client relations of production and control over vital resources.

There is more to the so-called process of “Mandingization” than a mere label. On the surface, it describes the substitution of old practices by equally old, but different, practices. In a more fundamental way, however, what I have been describing as Fatiya's new “way” is only a particular juncture in the time–space dimensions of the Kalunay Jola. Marzouk-Schmitz (1981: 4) implies that the “Mandingization” of Jola society has somehow come to an end: “One does not know why this phenomenon has stopped suddenly in time (end of the 19th century) and within precise geographical boundaries.” But social change is not a simple process, nor a one-time thing. The process of Manding–Jola adjustment is still going on, in interesting ways.

Type
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Information
Power, Prayer and Production
The Jola of Casamance, Senegal
, pp. 204 - 208
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1991

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  • Conclusions to Part III
  • Olga F. Linares, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama
  • Book: Power, Prayer and Production
  • Online publication: 04 November 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511557644.011
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  • Conclusions to Part III
  • Olga F. Linares, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama
  • Book: Power, Prayer and Production
  • Online publication: 04 November 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511557644.011
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • Conclusions to Part III
  • Olga F. Linares, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama
  • Book: Power, Prayer and Production
  • Online publication: 04 November 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511557644.011
Available formats
×