Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5d6d958fb5-x8cck Total loading time: 0.344 Render date: 2022-11-27T06:53:48.717Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Foreword

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2021

Get access

Summary

André Graça's new book on Portuguese cinema is a landmark study. It starts with a problem, asking the question: why has Portuguese film been so unsuccessful? Of course, one would need to clarify with greater precision the underpinning criteria for such a question; but if commercial success were the main criterion, the fact that Portugal currently holds the record of the most submissions for the Academy Award for Best International Feature Film without any Oscar nomination (35 submissions, 0 nominations) would normally decide the issue. But how about if one were to look – as the author of this book does – at how the Portuguese themselves have evaluated their own cinema? When compared to other EU countries Portugal comes in 28th – just ahead of Romania and Estonia – with just 2.5% of screen time in Portugal dedicated to national film. It just doesn't seem to add up – especially if one thinks of the brilliant films that Portuguese film-makers of the calibre of Manoel de Oliveira, Pedro Costa and Miguel Gomes have made over the years.

This is essentially the problem that this book sets out to solve, and it does so in a highly innovative as well as painstaking way. It chooses its case-study carefully, focusing on the highly significant period of Portuguese cinema, full of change as well as invention, running from 1960 until 2010. This research project then collates, triangulates and analyses the statistics relating to Portuguese cinema of this specific period, providing robust data on which films were produced, how many screenings they had, how many cinemagoers went to see them, how the distribution was managed, and what the box office revenues were. It adds into the mix a discussion of the traits that were often seen as characteristic of Portuguese cinema such as, for example, its fascination with the historical past, its predilection for films based on literary classics, and its focus on that most Portuguese of mysteries: ‘saudade’.

The author also looks at the growth of significant cinematic movements such as Portugal's ‘novo cinema’ – not to be confused with Brazil's ‘cinema novo’, though easily done – as well as its complex and sometimes fraught relationship with French, Spanish and Italian cinema (it was characterised by an ambiguous mix of fascination and resentment).

Type
Chapter
Information
Portuguese Cinema (1960–2010)
Consumption, Circulation and Commerce
, pp. ix - x
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×