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4 - Greater Majapahit: the Makings of a Proto-Indonesian Site across Decolonisation, 1900s–1950s

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 December 2019

Marieke Bloembergen
Affiliation:
Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, Leiden
Martijn Eickhoff
Affiliation:
NIOD Instituut voor Oorlogs-, Holocaust- en Genocidestudies
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Summary

This chapter, situated in the twentieth century, returns to Majapahit and analyses how and why it became a proto-national site, despite the lack of evidence of its greatness, and despite criticism from philological, Islamic, and communist voices. Both local and centralising colonial state-supported and Indonesian nationalist site interventions played a role in the makings of this site. At the site, Javanese nobleman and administrator Kromodjojo Adinegoro, who was born and raised in the region, and the Indies-born architect and self-taught archaeologist Henri Maclaine Pont stimulated long-term local engagement with the site. Meanwhile, for Indonesian nationalists active in Batavia, Majapahit shifted from a Greater Javanese site into a Java-centred proto-Indonesian one. Yet, this development does not mean that the interests of the different parties engaging with the site stopped, nor that alternative engagements (of religious or spiritual character) faded away.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Politics of Heritage in Indonesia
A Cultural History
, pp. 129 - 163
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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