Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-h4v4t Total loading time: 0.587 Render date: 2022-06-24T21:58:01.382Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

15 - The Media

Megaspectacles and Transparency in the Courts

from Part IV - Courts and Rights

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2019

Melissa Crouch
Affiliation:
University of New South Wales, Sydney
Get access

Summary

In an effort to encourage greater transparency in the judicial system, Indonesia often allows for television cameras in courtrooms, including live-to-air coverage. It has a long history of state-sponsored judicial ‘megaspectacles’, but in the post-New Order period a number of cases have transcended media platforms. Recent cases include intense foreign media reportage (such as the 2004 Schappelle Corby trial) and domestic sensations (such as 2016 Mirna Salihin’s Vietnamese coffee-cyanide murder case). In the case of the 2017 Ahok blasphemy trial, television cameras were first allowed to film because President ‘Jokowi’ argued for transparency, but later a decision was made to ban cameras and live reporting of his trial. There is debate over whether television cameras encourage transparent judgements or whether they provide a skewed version of the case to citizens. In this chapter we broadly discuss the role of the media in reporting court cases since reformasi, taking the case of television cameras in courtrooms as a case study. This research includes personal interviews with media practitioners, judges, and government officials. While Indonesia’s post-reformasi media practitioners are more critical of the judicial system than it was under Suharto, court reporting practices, including television coverage, remain highly problematic.

Type
Chapter
Information
The Politics of Court Reform
Judicial Change and Legal Culture in Indonesia
, pp. 334 - 352
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×