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Afterword

Lessons Learned: The Example of Women in Education

from Part III - Looking Ahead

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 January 2023

Fathali M. Moghaddam
Affiliation:
Georgetown University
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Summary

The concept of political plasticity leads us to identify areas of human behavior that are highly resistant to change and need special planning in order to bring about reforms, and also areas that have more potential for change and, through their change, will bring about larger transformations in societies. In domains such as ethnicity, leadership, rich–poor divide, and religion, planning for change must be undertaken taking into account, first, the great obstacles to change and, second, the possibility of backward movement away from democracy. But there are other domains where political plasticity is much higher and which can bring about more widespread transformations. The illustrative example of women in education is discussed in this chapter. The rapid progress of women in education throughout much of the world since World War II has been truly astonishing. If managed well, the progress of women in education can lead to progress in other areas, including population control and global warming.

Type
Chapter
Information
Political Plasticity
The Future of Democracy and Dictatorship
, pp. 154 - 161
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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  • Afterword
  • Fathali M. Moghaddam, Georgetown University
  • Book: Political Plasticity
  • Online publication: 15 January 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009277129.017
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  • Afterword
  • Fathali M. Moghaddam, Georgetown University
  • Book: Political Plasticity
  • Online publication: 15 January 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009277129.017
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Afterword
  • Fathali M. Moghaddam, Georgetown University
  • Book: Political Plasticity
  • Online publication: 15 January 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009277129.017
Available formats
×