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10 - Conclusion: Addressing Taxation’s Political Challenges

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2019

Gustavo A. Flores-Macías
Affiliation:
Cornell University, New York
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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