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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2022

Simon Smith
Affiliation:
Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham
Emma Whipday
Affiliation:
University of Newcastle
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Playing and Playgoing in Early Modern England
Actor, Audience and Performance
, pp. 262 - 276
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Bibliography
  • Edited by Simon Smith, Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham, Emma Whipday
  • Book: Playing and Playgoing in Early Modern England
  • Online publication: 10 March 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108773775.017
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  • Bibliography
  • Edited by Simon Smith, Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham, Emma Whipday
  • Book: Playing and Playgoing in Early Modern England
  • Online publication: 10 March 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108773775.017
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  • Bibliography
  • Edited by Simon Smith, Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham, Emma Whipday
  • Book: Playing and Playgoing in Early Modern England
  • Online publication: 10 March 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108773775.017
Available formats
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