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6 - Atoms and Causes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 July 2009

Antonia LoLordo
Affiliation:
University of Virginia
Antonia Lolordo
Affiliation:
Assistant Professor Corcoran Department of Philosophy, University of Virginia
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Summary

Early modern atomists and corpuscularians adopted their view for a number of different and sometimes inconsistent reasons and understood their atoms in a great variety of ways. Some, but by no means all or even a clear preponderance, thought that atoms moved through a void. Others – like Basso, Sennert, and Descartes – held that there were atoms or minima naturalia or stable small corpuscles, but that the world was a plenum. In some versions of corpuscularianism, atoms were all composed of the same, homogeneous matter, differing only in size and shape. In others, particles or atoms were understood as materially variegated so that there were particles or atoms of earth, air, fire, and water, for instance, or salt, sulfur, and mercury. Such views were often closely related to the minima naturalia tradition that can be traced back to Aristotle's remark that

since every finite body is exhausted by the repeated subtraction of a finite body, it is evident that everything cannot subsist in everything else. For let flesh be extracted from water and again more flesh be produced from the remainder by repeating the process of separation; then, even though the quantity separated out will continually decrease, still it will not fall below a certain magnitude.

Substances, that is, can be broken down into finite parts that are the smallest possible unit of that substance. Thus, there are minima of each substance, animal, vegetable, or mineral.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2006

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  • Atoms and Causes
    • By Antonia Lolordo, Assistant Professor Corcoran Department of Philosophy, University of Virginia
  • Antonia LoLordo, University of Virginia
  • Book: Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy
  • Online publication: 24 July 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511498503.009
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  • Atoms and Causes
    • By Antonia Lolordo, Assistant Professor Corcoran Department of Philosophy, University of Virginia
  • Antonia LoLordo, University of Virginia
  • Book: Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy
  • Online publication: 24 July 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511498503.009
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Atoms and Causes
    • By Antonia Lolordo, Assistant Professor Corcoran Department of Philosophy, University of Virginia
  • Antonia LoLordo, University of Virginia
  • Book: Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy
  • Online publication: 24 July 2009
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511498503.009
Available formats
×