Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-z5d2w Total loading time: 0.271 Render date: 2021-11-27T02:47:56.047Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

12 - The Central Franconian Tone

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 February 2010

Carlos Gussenhoven
Affiliation:
Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Inevitably, the more intonation contrasts a language has, the harder it is to maintain a system of lexical tone contrasts, and vice versa. West Germanic languages have a large number of intonation contrasts, and so, a priori, the introduction of a lexical tone contrast in one of those languages should be problematic. Essentially, this would double the number of required contrasts, since every intonation pattern will have to be usable on words from two tonal word classes. The language is likely to respond to this situation by reducing the number of intonation contours; by enhancing pitch contrasts by means of other phonetic parameters, like duration or vowel quality; or, if all else fails, by banning certain forms that would otherwise be too similar to other forms, or be particularly hard to pronounce. In the last case, forms that are generated by the grammar are simply not used. We may well regret that we cannot artificially introduce a tone contrast in a West Germanic language to see what will happen, but here is the good news: a lexical tone developed quite spontaneously in the Central Franconian dialect of German, probably around 1300. The novel feature spread, probably from Cologne, as far south as Luxembourg and and as far west as Hasselt (Belgium) and Maastricht (the Netherlands). The tonal area must have been larger than it is now, but it still measures some 160 km north-to-south and 125 km east-to-west (Schmidt 1986; de Vaan 1999), covering four countries in the Dutch–German dialect continuum.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • The Central Franconian Tone
  • Carlos Gussenhoven, Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Book: The Phonology of Tone and Intonation
  • Online publication: 18 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511616983.013
Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

  • The Central Franconian Tone
  • Carlos Gussenhoven, Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Book: The Phonology of Tone and Intonation
  • Online publication: 18 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511616983.013
Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

  • The Central Franconian Tone
  • Carlos Gussenhoven, Katholieke Universiteit Nijmegen, The Netherlands
  • Book: The Phonology of Tone and Intonation
  • Online publication: 18 February 2010
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511616983.013
Available formats
×