Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-nmvwc Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-13T20:31:47.727Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

2 - Concepts

from Part One - The TARGETS model

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 July 2010

Jan Rotmans
Affiliation:
National Institute of Public Health and Environment (RIVM), The Netherlands
Bert de Vries
Affiliation:
National Institute of Public Health and Environment (RIVM), The Netherlands
Get access

Summary

Global change is an extremely complex phenomenon, encompassing a wide variety of issues. An adequate approach to such a broad subject demands careful consideration of a host of interactions between people and the environment and a clear understanding of driving forces, be the demographic, social, economic or technological. If we wish to tackle such a complex issue, we need to establish some basic guiding concepts. This chapter proposes an integrated systems approach to a number of key aspects of global change: population, health, energy, land, water and element cycles. We define what we mean by ‘system’ and ‘model’ and introduce a conceptual framework for analysing global change. As a mechanism to structure this conceptual framework we use the Pressure-State-Impact-Response (PSIR) approach. We look at two different kinds of integration (vertical and horizontal) and discuss different levels of complexity. Finally, we explain the importance of communicating the results of integrated systems analysis and suggest the value of using different communication methods such as indicators and visualisation.

Introduction

Most systematic studies of global change have so far focused on subsystems in isolation. However, it is well known that when parts are combined into more complex structures, the resulting system may exhibit quite different properties and behaviour (Gregory, 1981). As mentioned in Chapter 1, there is a growing interest in an integrated approach to global change (for an overview see Parson (1996) and Rotmans et al. (1996)).

Type
Chapter
Information
Perspectives on Global Change
The TARGETS Approach
, pp. 15 - 32
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 1997

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×