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Chapter 15 - Spinal cord injury

from Section 3 - Specific conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 December 2010

Clare J. Fowler
Affiliation:
The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen's Square, London
Jalesh N. Panicker
Affiliation:
The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen's Square, London
Anton Emmanuel
Affiliation:
University College London
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Summary

Spinal cord injury (SCI) can be a consequence of motor vehicle accidents, sports injury, violence, spinal vascular events, infections, disc prolapse or spinal surgery. Bladder dysfunction after SCI can be divided into two phases; a period of spinal shock and chronic phase. The injury can also be classified according to the level, i.e. suprasacral or sacral and degree of completeness. In patients with suprasacral lesions the acute period is followed by the chronic phase, when there may be both storage and voiding dysfunction. As with other causes of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO), the goal of bladder management in SCI patients is to preserve the upper urinary tract and renal function, to avoid urological complications and to improve patients' quality of life by restoring independence and continence. The vast majority experience alterations in sexual function following SCI. The degree of sexual dysfunction depends on the level and completeness of injury.
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Pelvic Organ Dysfunction in Neurological Disease
Clinical Management and Rehabilitation
, pp. 241 - 254
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

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