Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-gq7q9 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-20T14:01:52.619Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

PART 2 - Violent representations: intellectuals and prison writing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2009

Rita Copeland
Affiliation:
University of Pennsylvania
Get access

Summary

INTRODUCTION

The heretical classroom envisions the leveling of traditional magisterial hierarchies. How, accordingly, does the dissenting community reimagine the work and reconfigure the social relations of intellectuals? R. I. Moore notes that heresy differed from other objects of persecution in the Middle Ages “in being identifiable with personal leaders and possessing its own structures of personal authority.” Intellectuals assume the roles of teachers, advocates, and representatives, and also of mobilizers and witnesses. They embody a political position which they articulate to and on behalf of a certain public, a community that can define itself through its public advocates and expositors. The intellectual leaders of medieval heretical groups are the most visible participants of their resistance movements. And it is with that particular visibility that they must occupy the already problematic space that official legal structures make for self-representation among dissidents.

One of those spaces – in no way an abstract one – from which dissenting intellectuals speak is prison. Two Lollard writers come forward to us through “personal” narratives of interrogation under imprisonment: the Lollard priests Richard Wyche and William Thorpe. While these heretical intellectuals are hardly unique for having suffered imprisonment, or for having produced important writings while under some kind of detention, the con-figurations of history and narrative form that condition the accounts of Wyche and Thorpe give us texts that cannot fit general categories.

Type
Chapter
Information
Pedagogy, Intellectuals, and Dissent in the Later Middle Ages
Lollardy and Ideas of Learning
, pp. 141 - 150
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2001

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×